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Morgan Silver Dollar

In its day, the Morgan Silver Dollar was the ultimate hedge against inflation. Designed by U.S. Mint Assistant Engraver George T. Morgan, the Morgan Dollar was the second standard silver dollar produced as currency.

Canadian Silver Maple Leaf

The Canadian Silver Maple Leaf is the purest silver coin minted in the world. At 99.99% purity, its base metal-free composition is possible by technical breakthroughs at the Royal Canadian Mint (RCM). First issued in 1988, the coin is a celebrated asset of the bullion offered by the RCM, and has been issued with over 30 commemorative privy marks.

American Silver Eagle (proof)

This elegant, high gloss coin was first struck in 1987. Unlike the bullion version of the same coin, the American Silver Eagle proof coin bears the strike of the Mint from which they were issued, and are not put into circulation. With a silver content of 99.9%, the purity of this proof coin is backed by the U.S. government.

American Silver Eagle (bullion)

First issued in 1986 after the passage of the 1985 Liberty Coin Act, the American Silver Eagle bullion coin is the official silver bullion coin of the United States. Reissuing the 1916 designs of Walking Liberty by Adolph Weinman, this gorgeous coin is minted in San Francisco, West Point, NY and Philadelphia, has 99.9% purity, and has a face value of $1.

Saint-Gaudens double eagle ($20)

Until the start of the 20th Century, the U.S. Mint’s coinage was only designed by employees of the Mint. But that changed in 1904 when President Teddy Roosevelt, in acknowledging that “the state of our coinage is artistically of atrocious hideousness”, commissioned his friend and world-renowned artist Augustus Saint-Gaudens to design a coin with "some beauty". The exquisite Saint-Gaudens double eagle ($20) is the result of these two giants of history and their belief that the United States deserved a coinage as epic as the future that lay before the country.

Liberty Head Double Eagle ($20)

The twenty dollar Liberty Head, also known as a "double eagle," was the first gold coin struck by the U.S. Mint. First authorized in early 1849, it was struck that year as a response to the sudden flow of gold, first in North Carolina in the 1830s, then compounded by the California Gold Rush in 1849. Prior to the Liberty Head, all U.S. coinage was made of silver, with the largest denomination being $10, or one eagle, hence the nickname, double eagle.

Liberty Head (Coronet Head) collection

In the late 18th Century, with passage of the Coinage Act of 1792 and establishment of the U.S. Mint, a set of standards was applied to all gold coins struck by the United States government.

Gold Indian Head Eagle ($10)

After successfully landing the highly esteemed sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens to redesign the some aspect of U.S. coinage in 1904, President Theodore Roosevelt asked the artist to make models for several different denominations of gold coins. In 1905, the artist agreed and thus began a fantastic tale of presidential coin design.

South African Krugerrand

The first national bullion coin in the world, the South African Krugerrand was first issued in 1967 to demonstrate the quality of that country's gold. The Krugerrand is named after Paul Kruger, the 5th president of South Africa and war hero of the Second Boer War, and the rand, the official South African currency unit. The coin was such a wild success that other countries followed suit, issuing their own bullion coins.